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Recommended Rolling Door Maintenance Practices for Building Maintenance Supervisors

Posted by Gray Decker Ariam on Sat, May 06, 2017 @ 12:35 PM

 

Recommended Rolling Door Maintenance Practices for Building Maintenance Supervisors; serviceman inspecting door.Recommended Rolling Door Maintenance Practices for Building Maintenance Supervisors; Dasma Technical Sheet #270.

Introduction

This Technical Data Sheet is intended as a reference for Building Maintenance Supervisors. It may be used as a guideline for periodic review of rolling doors to discover the most common, easily visible problems. In no way does it replace the regular maintenance recommended in the door manufacturer's instructions. Contact the door manufacturer to obtain information regarding a trained service provider and maintenance intervals. TDS-270 is intended as a supplement to DASMA Technical Data Sheet #269, Rolling Door Performance Evaluation.

Headplate Brackets

Recommended Rolling Door Maintenance Practices for Building Maintenance Supervisors; Head plate.

WARNING: Tension headplate brackets and counterbalance assemblies are under extreme spring tension and could result in death or serious injury.

1. Do NOT try to adjust the tension wheel (charge wheel). Call for service if spring needs adjusting.

2. Brackets should be oriented in the vertical plane and perpendicular to the wall; sway bracing may be necessary.

3. Brackets must be securely fastened to the wall or to the guide wall angles.

4. Call for service when expansion anchors appear loose in walls of masonry construction.

5. Call for service when bearing looks or sounds worn or damaged.

6. Watch tension bracket during operation. The tension wheel (charge wheel) and tension shaft must not rotate during operation of the door. Call for service if they rotate.

7. Inspect product safety label.

Guides

Recommended Rolling Door Maintenance Practices for Building Maintenance Supervisors, Guides.

1. Wall angles must be secured to the jambs with fasteners in each slot.

2. Guide assembly fasteners must be secure in each hole/slot.

3. Guide gap must be uniform top to bottom.

4. Damaged/bent guide angles must not bind the curtain and bottom bar.

5. The stops at the top of guides must be in place and secured properly to stop the bottom bar at the top of each guide.

6. Inspect product safety labels.

Hood

Recommended Rolling Door Maintenance Practices for Building Maintenance Supervisors; hood.

1. Hood, if provided, must be properly secured so it will not fall.

2. Hood must not bind against the curtain.

Door Operation

Recommended Rolling Door Maintenance Practices for Building Maintenance Supervisors; door operation.

1. Door should stay in the open position; call for service if door must be propped open.

2. Door should be easy to operate near the open and closed positions. Door will require more force to open through the middle.

3. Force required to open the door should not exceed 35 lbs. on hand chain or 25 lbs. on crank operation. Significant deviations from these values may indicate a counterbalance problem requiring service by a trained door systems technician.

4. Evaluate the performance of electric doors quarterly. If the electric operator sounds like it is laboring/straining to open the door, then do the following:

- Close the door using the operator, engage manual operation, and open the door.

- Call for service if the force required to operate the door is excessive. A spring counterbalance evaluation should be considered.

- Operator limits must be set so 1) bottom bar is not tight against guide stops and 2) curtain does not sag when closed.

5. The operation of the door MUST be viewable/visible from the door control switch location.

6. Per the requirements of UL 325, constant pressure is required on the “close” or “down” button/switch for doors with no sensing edge on door bottom bar, or with no photoelectric eyes, or when sensing devices are not functioning properly.

7. Test the door sensing devices at least weekly: - Be sure to test at both ends of sensing edge for proper operation. - See DASMA Technical Data Sheet #368 for more information.

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8. Gear operated doors:

Recommended Rolling Door Maintenance Practices for Building Maintenance Supervisors, Gear operated doors.

- Check that keystock is properly set in keyway

- Look for broken teeth and debris.

- Clean and lubricate gears.

- Tighten set screws.

9. Sprocket and roller chain drive:

- Check that keystock is properly set in keyway

- Align sprockets as required and tighten set screws.

- Inspect roller chain for damage or wear using DASMA Technical Data Sheet #268.

- Clean and lubricate the roller chain. See DASMA Technical Data Sheet #268.

Curtain Slat & Grille Rods

1. Close and open the door

2. The curtain/rods and bottom bar must move freely in the guides and not rub against the header or the opening in the ceiling.

3. Call for service if curtain endlocks or grille rods rub against the headplate bracket.

4. Endlocks and windlocks must be securely fastened to slat ends.

Product Safety Labels

Recommended Rolling Door Maintenance Practices for Building Maintenance Supervisors, product safety label

1. Product safety labels should be periodically inspected and cleaned by the product user.

2. Replacement labels should be ordered from the door manufacturer.

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Credit: DASMA Technical Data Sheet #270

The expert supertechnicians of Overhead Door Company of The Meadowlands & NYC are always available to provide repairs, installation and maintenance for your rolling doors

For more information, please give us a call at 973-471-4060 or email us at: info@dockndoor.com We service Northern New Jersey (Bergen, Passaic, Hudson, Union, Essex, Morris, Hudson, Hunterdon, Middlesex, Mercer and Somerset county/counties), Manhattan, New York City, Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, Bronx, Westchester and Rockland.

Tags: Planned Maintenance, TDS-270, Dasma Technical Sheet, Headplate Brackets, Hood, Door Operation, Product Safety Labels, Curtain Slat & Grille Rods, Planned Maintenance for Rolling Steel Doors

Rolling Door/Gate Red Zone Clearances for Install and Service

Posted by Gray Decker Ariam on Wed, May 03, 2017 @ 09:05 AM

Rolling Door Gate Red Zone for Install and Service; rolling door by Overhead Door Company of The Meadowlands .

Rolling Door Gate Red Zone for Install and Service; Dasma Technical Sheet 276

Rolling Door “Red Zone” for Installations and Service

Introduction

When installers arrive at a job site to install a rolling door, it is a common occurrence for them to encounter obstructions that impede or prevent the installation of the door. Many times other trades have come into an area and installed electrical equipment, mechanical equipment, or walls and ceilings near the door opening before the door is installed. Consequently, the door cannot be installed, resulting in costly rework and lost time. In order to aid architects, project managers, contractors and building owners, DASMA is providing pre-installation “Red Zone” diagrams.

The “Red Zone” is the area required to remain clear for installation and maintenance of the door, and is denoted by hatched areas on the diagrams. These areas indicate door and hardware locations and, most importantly, service area requirements. A rolling door dealer can supply the pertinent information shown in tabulated form on the appropriate diagram. The industry advises that the completed diagram be submitted with the door shop drawings, signed by the site superintendent, and distributed to the building owner and other pertinent trades.

Wall areas encompassed by the “Red Zone” are to be kept clear of electrical and mechanical equipment including conduit, junction boxes, light fixtures, sprinkler equipment, heating units, cranes, monorails and other items.

Diagrams

Red Zone diagram for Rolling Doors

• Applies to manually operated rolling doors.

Red Zone diagrams for Rolling Doors with Operators

• Applies to motor operated rolling doors.

• Motor operator mounting orientation should be selected by checking the appropriate box.

• Motor clearances should include the space required for installation and wiring the operator.

• Separate forms have been created for bracket-mounted and wall-mounted operators.

Rolling Door Gate Red Zone for Install and Service; Red Zone Diagram for Rolling Doors.

Rolling Door Gate Red Zone for Install and Service; Red Zone Diagram for Rolling Doors with bracket-mounted operators.

Rolling Door Gate Red Zone for Install and Service; Red Zone Diagram for Rolling Doors with wall-mounted operators.

Credit: Dasma Technical Sheet #276

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Overhead Door Company of The Meadowlands & NYC Rolling Door Service Photos:

Rolling Door Gate Red Zone for Install and Service; rolling door service photo; white rolling doors.

Rolling Door Gate Red Zone for Install and Service; rolling door service picture; gray rolling doors.

Rolling Door Gate Red Zone for Install and Service; rolling door service picture.

 

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Get the best Rolling door service from the highly skilled technicians of Overhead Door Company of The Meadowlands & NYC. We provide quick response to your rolling door service request; installation repairs and maintenance.

For more information, please give us a call at 973-471-4060 or email us at: info@dockndoor.com We service Northern New Jersey (Bergen, Passaic, Hudson, Union, Essex, Morris, Hudson, Hunterdon, Middlesex, Mercer and Somerset county/counties), Manhattan, New York City, Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, Bronx, Westchester and Rockland. 

Tags: Red Zone diagrams for Rolling Doors with Operators, Rolling Door “Red Zone”, Red Zone diagram for Rolling Doors, Service Clearances for Rolling Steel Doors

Rolling Door/Coiling Gate Terminology

Posted by Gray Decker Ariam on Sat, Apr 29, 2017 @ 08:37 AM

Rolling Door Gate Terminology rolling doors.jpg

Every interested individuals, whether they are part of the rolling door industry, or not should be familiar with the rolling door/ gate terminology. Knowing these terminology will help you  to effectively communicate with other people on the same industry and most  specially when operating and determining the problem of your rolling door.

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Rolling Door Gate Terminology Dasma Technical Sheet 277, TDS277.png

ROLLING DOOR/ GATE TERMINOLOGY

An industry terminology document can prove to be a helpful document:

  • To facilitate communication between parties within the industry
  • To improve the effectiveness of industry standards and other documents
  • To reduce potential confusion and misunderstanding by recognizing and cross-referencing multiple terms that may have the same definition
  • To educate interested parties outside an industry

The members of DASMA have compiled an extensive list of terms and definitions related to the rolling door industry to achieve these objectives.

The terminology information encompasses many common terms used in the rolling door industry. You will note that some terms are cross-referenced to a “primary” term. The “primary” term is the one that would be used most often in DASMA standards and technical publications. 

Concerning the terms and definitions contained in this Technical Data Sheet, please note the following:

  • This Technical Data Sheet is not to be construed as a standard-type document, and therefore the terms and definitions contained herein do not imply or suggest a given use to a particular manufacturer.
  • This Technical Data Sheet includes a compilation of commonly used terms and may not be considered complete from an industry viewpoint.
  • The terms and definitions are not universal. Variations within the industry may exist with regard to precise meaning.

An asterisk (*) denotes fire door terminology only.

1.0 SCOPE

The scope of this technical data sheet shall be to provide industry-accepted definitions for common rolling door terms, with a rolling door being defined as a vertically operating, coiling door typically used in commercial or industrial applications. Multiple terms with the same definition are included if needed based on common usage of such terms. The primary term shall contain the definition.

2.0 TERMS AND DEFINITIONS

Access Panel: An opening in a ceiling for access to tension adjusting wheel and to drive mechanism (motor, crank, chain hoist). Furnished by the ceiling subcontractor or general contractor and not by the door manufacturer.

Adjusting Wheel:  See Tension Wheel. All Weather Door: A rolling service door having all the weather-stripping features, consisting of guide weather-stripping, hood baffle and bottom astragal.

Astragal: A compressible or deformable seal provided on the bottom edge of a door.

*Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ): The organization, office, or individual responsible for approving equipment, an installation, or a procedure.

*Automatic Closing Device: A device, that causes the door or window to close when activated by a fusible link or detector.

*Automatic Fire Detectors: See Detectors. Backroom: Amount of clear unobstructed space extending back from the face of the wall.

Barrel Assembly: A cylindrical horizontal member at the head of the opening that supports the door curtain and contains the counterbalance springs.

Barrel Ring: A component attached to the counterbalance pipe or barrel, which is used to increase the curtain wrap diameter and which is attached to the curtain top slat.

Bar Stop: See Wind Bar.

Base Plate: Optional plate mounted on the floor to distribute weight from a framing system supporting the door.

Bellmouth: Flared upper portion of guides to ease entry of curtain into the guides.

Between Jamb Mounted: Type of mounting where the guides are positioned between the mounting surfaces and not on the surface (interior or exterior) of the wall.

Bottom Bar: A reinforcing member at the bottom of a curtain or curtain panel.

Brackets: Plates bolted to the wall or to extensions of the guide wall angles that serve to support the barrel and form end closures for the hood.

Brush Seals: Term used to refer generically to the use of brush filament material either in use as a weather-seal or when used as smoke seals for smoke and fire doors.

Brush Weather-Stripping: Weather-stripping for use on all configurations of doors to close the gaps at jambs and header. Brush material can be UL listed for "fire door" use.

Cable Sensor Edge: An edge that uses two cables inside a standard neoprene loop astragal. Upon connection with motor operator, a sensing field is established between the two cables. Any disturbance to this field causes the motor and door to stop and reverse (or stop).

Chain Hoist: A mechanical device used to raise and lower the door by use of hand chain.

Charge Pin: A metal pin used to lock tension wheel after proper spring tension is applied.

Charge Wheel: See Tension Wheel

Closed Position: A position of the door curtain with the underside of the bottom bar, including an astragal or sensing edge in contact with the sill along the entire width of the opening.

Counter Shutter: A door which closes on a counter-type sill.

Counterbalancing: A method by which the hanging weight of the door curtain is balanced by the helical torsion springs or weights.

Counterbalance Assembly: An assembly consisting of torsion springs, spring anchors, and a shaft, which is positioned inside the barrel assembly.

*Crush Plates: Bearing plates provided where doors are mounted on wall units with hollow cells to accommodate through-wall bolts to prevent crushing of the hollow wall.

Curtain: Interlocked slats assembled together.

Curtain Slats: Formed or extruded members that comprise the curtain on a rolling door.

Cycle: An action on the door from the fully closed position, to the fully open position, and returned to the fully closed position.

Cylinder Lock: Key-operated locking device located on the bottom bar.

*Detectors: A device suitable for connection to a circuit that has a sensor that responds to a physical stimulus such as heat or smoke.

Door/Grille Combo: Combined assembly of a rolling service door and a rolling grille door sharing guides and common bracket plates. Allows full security when required and ventilation with door opened and grille closed.

Double Throw Lock: Center locking device that throws a locking bar into both guides, mounted on bottom bar.

Drive Gear: Large gear for chain- or crankoperated units. It is directly fastened to the door shaft on the drive side bracket plate.

Drive Plug Assembly: See Plug End.

Drive Shaft: The shaft in the barrel that is securely attached to the barrel, through welding or pinning. When this shaft rotates the barrel should also rotate.

*Dropout: Weighted mechanical device for disengaging gearing or motor operator for rolling fire doors. Also used to activate closing spring and to release governor in case of fire.

*Drop Test: Test performed on a fire door to ensure proper operation during emergency. Testing is required to be performed annually (see NFPA 80).

"E" Guides: - Common expression for the shape that guides form when they are mounted to steel jamb supports or frames.

Electric Sensor Edge: See Sensing Edge.

*Electromechanical Release: A device, that triggers the automatic closing device upon receipt of a signal from a fire alarm or detection system.

Emergency Electric Operation: Motor operation of a door via Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) when facility line power is off.

Emergency Release Device: Permits emergency egress (exit). Device allows manual operation of the door without electrical power to open.

Endlock: A component which is attached to slats to prevent lateral shifting.

End Plates: See Brackets.

Exterior Hood: A hood mounted on the exterior (weather exposed) surface of a wall.

Exterior Mounted: Condition where door is mounted on the exterior (weather exposed) surface of a wall. Face of Wall: Door mounting condition where guides mount directly to the wall, and side clearance is allowed for tension wheel and drive mechanism.

Fascia: Metal closure for the back of door housing.

Fenestrated Slats: A curtain with slots in slats to allow air infiltration.

*Fire Door: The door component of a fire door assembly.

*Fire Door Assembly: Any combination of a fire door, a frame, hardware, and other accessories that together provide a specific degree of fire protection to the opening.

*Fire Protection Rating: The designation indicating the duration of the fire test exposure to which a fire door assembly or fire window assembly was exposed and for which it successfully met all acceptance criteria as determined in accordance with NFPA 252, Standard Methods of Fire Tests of Door Assemblies, or NFPA 257, Standard for Fire Tests of Window Assemblies, respectively.

*Fire Shutter: A fire door assembly used for the protection of a window opening in the exterior wall.

*Flame Baffle: A hinged piece of sheet metal within the hood that, when released, closes the space between the top of the curtain and the hood of a rolling steel fire door.

Fuse Link Housing: A box in which fusible links are sometimes furnished when rolling fire doors are mounted above ceiling to provide a finished exposure area in ceiling for link.

*Fusible Link: Two pieces of metal held together by low-melting-point solder.

Gear Cover: Metal cover protecting the drive mechanism from weather and debris.

Governor: A device that controls the rate of descent of the door during automatic closure.

Grille Door: See Rolling Grille Door.

Guide: Vertical assembly in which the curtain travels and that is fastened to the jamb, retaining the edges of the door curtain and closing the space between the curtain edges and the jamb.

Guide: Vertical assembly in which the curtain travels and that is fastened to the jamb, retaining the edges of the door curtain and closing the space between the curtain edges and the jamb.

Guide Weatherseal (1 Side): A strip of weatherstripping material that is attached to the exterior guide angle and designed to compress against the exterior surface of the curtain slats. The material may be vinyl, neoprene rubber, or brush filaments.

Guide Weatherseal (2 Side): The weatherstripping material is applied on both the exterior and interior guide angles and is designed to compress against both the interior and exterior curtain surfaces.

Gusset: Metal reinforcement plate, angle or bracket which is fastened in corners to stiffen joints.

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Hand of Operation: The side on which the door operator is placed, as viewed from the mountingsurface side of the door. It is either a right-hand (RH) or left-hand (LH) operation.

Header Seal: Weather-stripping mounted at opening header to seal the opening between header and curtain.

Headplates: See Brackets. Headroom: Vertical clear space required above the door opening, and below the lowest ceiling obstruction, required for proper installation and operation of the door and its hardware.

Helical: A term referring to the type of torsion spring used in the spring counterbalance.

High Cycle Design: Door components and operator designed for a fixed number of cycles for a specific period of time. Hood: A housing that mounts horizontally, serving as an enclosure for the counterbalance assembly and door header. Hood Baffle: A flap of material with one end.

Hood: A housing that mounts horizontally, serving as an enclosure for the counterbalance assembly and door header.

Hood Baffle: A flap of material with one end secured to the interior of the hood and the other end resting on the curtain, designed to retard air infiltration over the top of the curtain and through the hood.

Housing: See Hood.

Inertia Brake: A unit that is attached to the door shaft and head-plate or wall, which will stop the door from free falling should there be a failure in the motor operator brake, roller chain drive or torsion spring assembly. When the shaft is moving at a certain RPM the unit will lock up the shaft, preventing it from moving until door can be repaired.

Initial Charge: See Initial Turns.

Initial Tension: See Initial Turns.

Initial Turns: Amount of turns of the tension shaft to apply spring tension from zero with the door in the fully open position. These turns provide the minimum moment or force to hold door in the open position.

Inset: See Setback.

Inside Adjusting Wheel: See Inside Tension Wheel.

Inside Tension Wheel: Spring adjusting wheel located inside bracket plate so that no additional side-room is required beyond the guide.

Interlock, External: An electro-mechanical device that prevents motor operation when door lock is engaged.

Intermediate Hood Support: A rigid member, which is contoured to the shape of the hood and mounted to the wall, between the head-plates. The hood is then attached to the support to give the hood rigidity.

Jamb: The vertical member that frames the side of an opening in the wall.

Jamb Angle: See Wall Angle.

Jamb Load: Force exerted on jamb by guide assembly when curtain is subjected to wind load.

*Labeled: Equipment or materials to which has been attached a label, symbol, or other identifying mark of an organization that is acceptable to the Authority Having Jurisdiction and concerned with product evaluation, that maintains periodic inspection of production of labeled equipment or materials, and by whose labeling the manufacturer indicates compliance with appropriate standards or performance in a specified manner.

*Labeled: Equipment or materials to which has been attached a label, symbol, or other identifying mark of an organization that is acceptable to the Authority Having Jurisdiction and concerned with product evaluation, that maintains periodic inspection of production of labeled equipment or materials, and by whose labeling the manufacturer indicates compliance with appropriate standards or performance in a specified manner.

Lift Handle: A handle attached to the inside or outside of a door section, to be grasped by hand when a door is to be operated manually.

Lintel: A horizontal member spanning and carrying the load above an opening.

*Magnetic Release: Device connected to a smoke detector or alarm system, that on either an interruption of electrical power or applied signal will release the automatic closing device of a fire door or fire shutter. 

Manual Override: Means of operating a door by chain or by hand in case of power loss.

Manual Override: Means of operating a door by chain or by hand in case of power loss.

Motor Cover: Cover to protect the motor from weather, debris, or to meeting OSHA safety requirements.

*NFPA 72, National Fire Alarm Code: Code deals with the application, installation, performance, and maintenance of fire alarm systems and their components.

*NFPA 80, Standard for Fire Door and Fire Windows: Regulates the installation and maintenance of assemblies and devices used to protect openings in walls, floors, and ceilings against the spread of fire and smoke within, into, or out of buildings.

*NFPA 105, Standard for the Installation of Smoke-Control Door Assemblies: Regulates the use of door assemblies in openings where passage of smoke is to be governed.

Offset: Dimension between face of header or jamb and centerline of curtain. Required to reduce drag of curtain on bellmouth of guides when curtain is in a lowered position.

*Oversized: A term applying to a fire door or fire shutter assembly that has not been fire tested, but receives a label or a Certificate of Inspection which does not indicate that the door is capable of furnishing “Standard Fire Protection”, but that the door conforms to the construction requirements and was manufactured in accordance with the door’s listing / approved agency requirements.

Packout: Guide build-out to clear an obstruction or provide clearance for drive or tension mechanism when door is between-jamb mounted.

Panic Release Device: See Emergency Release Device.

Pass Door: Hollow-metal pedestrian door integrated into the rolling door, the frame of which is hinged at the jamb so doorframe swings out of the opening.

Perforated Slats: See Fenestrated Slats

Pipe Shaft: See Barrel Assembly.

Plug End: Drive end of barrel assembly driven by gear or sprocket for which the curtain is raised and lowered. Consists of assembly of short solid shaft and one or more round plates welded to the shaft and pipe, which fit within the pipe.

Pre-Turns: See Initial Turns

Rolling Counter Door: A non-fire rated door assembly used in walls where the primary purpose of the opening is for non-pedestrian use, such as counter service for food, a pharmaceutical dispensary, package and baggage transfer, or observation ports.

Rolling Counter Fire Door: A fire rated door assembly with an automatic-releasing device used in fire rated walls where the primary purpose of the opening is for non-pedestrian use, such as counter service for food, a pharmaceutical dispensary, package and baggage transfer.

Rolling Door: A vertically operating, coiling door typically used in commercial or industrial applications.

Rolling Fire Door: A fire rated vertically operating coiling door assembly with an automatic-releasing device typically used in commercial or industrial applications, providing protection in fire rated wall openings.

Rolling Grille Door: A vertically operating rolling gate, offering security without loss of visibility or ventilation. Widely used in shopping malls and parking areas.

Rolling Service Door: A vertically operating, coiling door typically used in commercial or industrial applications, with a curtain consisting of formed metal slats interlocking together.

Rolling Service Counter Door: See Service Counter Door.

Rolling Sheet Door: See DASMA TDS-283.

Rolling Steel Fire Door: See Rolling Fire Door.

Roll-Up Door: See Rolling Door.

Safety Stop Bearing: See Inertia Brake.

Security Chain Box: Metal enclosure that encloses hand chain in a steel pad-lockable assembly attached to door guide.

Sensing Edge: A device added to the underside of the bottom bar of a power operated rolling door, which stops or reverses the door curtain upon contact with an obstruction when closing under power.

Sensing Edge, Pneumatic: An air hose installed inside the bottom bar astragal and connected to a diaphragm switch, to signal the motor operator to stop or stop-and reverse the door.

Sensing Edge, Electric: An electrical-mechanical device attached to the bottom of an electricallyoperated door for the dual purposes of (1) signaling the operator to stop or reverse door motion whenever the device senses an obstruction in the downward path of the door, and (2) sealing between the door and the floor.

Sensing Edge, Infrared Type: Bottom bar astragal enclosing a tube with an infrared transmitter at one end and a detector at the other end. When IR source is obstructed the motor operator will stop or stop and-reverse the door.

Service Counter Door: An assembly consisting of a rolling counter door that incorporates a foursided framed used in walls where the primary purpose of the opening is for non-pedestrian use, such as counter service for food, a pharmaceutical dispensary, package and baggage transfer, or observation ports.

*Service Counter Fire Door: A fire rated door assembly consisting of a rolling counter fire door that incorporates a four-sided frame used for the protection of openings in fire rated walls where the primary purpose of the opening is for nonpedestrian use, such as counter service for food, a pharmaceutical dispensary, package and baggage transfer, or observation ports.

Setback: A standard space where the guide is recessed from edge of the jamb at both sides of opening on a face of wall-mounted door.

Sideroom: Required unobstructed space on either side of the opening.

Slat: See Curtain Slat.

Slide Bolt: Locking device on bottom bar, which slides into guide or guide shoe and is equipped for padlocking. Mounted either inside, outside or both sides of the door.

Slide Grille: A side-sliding grille product that requires little headroom and no floor track. The grill is able to follow a curved lease line and stacks into a side pocket in the wall.

Sloped Bottom Bar: Bottom bar with a vertical dimension larger on one end than the other, to match sloped sill of opening. Requires additional head room to keep clear opening when door is up.

*Smoke Detector: A device that senses visible or invisible particles of combustion and/or heat.

*Smoke Gasketing: Brush seal used on fire doors or fire shutters to reduce the passage of smoke and gases.

*Spot-Type Detector: A device with a detecting element concentrated at a particular location. Typical examples are bimetallic detectors, fusible alloy detectors, certain pneumatic rate of rise detectors, certain smoke detectors, and thermoelectric detectors.

Spring Cycle Life: Spring counterbalance is designed for a fixed number of cycles.

Spring Counterbalance: See Counterbalancing

Stand-out: The distance that guide assembly extends out from the wall on face-of-wall mounted doors.

*Starter, Fire Door: A mechanical device to start the closing of door in the event of a fire and to do it independently of the hand chain, crank or motor operator normally used to close door.

Starter Slats: Partial slats used to connect curtain to barrel or barrel rings.

Stops: Bars mounted at top of guides to prevent bottom bar from traveling out of the guides when the curtain is fully raised.

Stop Lock Bearing: See Inertia Brake.

Tapered Bottom Bar: See Sloped Bottom Bar.

Tension Wheel: A component attached to the counterbalance tension shaft, which controls the spring tension as it is locked to the bracket. 

Thru-Wall Operation: A door driven by means of a hand chain, crank or motor operator located on the opposite side of the wall.

*Thru-Wall Fusible Link: Extending a fuse linkage to the opposite side of an opening, with respect to the side the door is mounted on. Required per NFPA 80 for all non-exterior mounted doors.

Thumb Turn Mortise Cylinder: Locking device, much like a cylinder lock but does not require a key to lock or unlock.

Torsion Spring: A spring that works by turning one end about a longitudinal axis while the other end is held or turned in the opposite direction, developing torque.

Tubular Operator: A cylindrical operator that mounts directly into the pipe and electrically drives the barrel assembly.

Vision Lite: Glazing that is mounted in a door.

Wall Angle: An angle of the guide assembly, which attaches to the face of wall and supports the load of the door assembly.

Wicket Door: See Pass Door.

Wind Bar: Channel or bar attached to guide, which engage windlocks under wind load.

Windlock: A component attached at predetermined intervals to slat ends to prevent curtain from leaving the guides under wind load, and which is used in conjunction with wind bars inside the guides.

Working Turns: The additional winding of the springs as the barrel rotates and the curtain closes.

"Z" Guides: - Common expression for the shape that guides form when they are mounted to masonry jambs. 

Credit: DASMA Technical Data Sheet #277

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For more information, please give us a call at 973-471-4060 or email us at: info@dockndoor.com We service Northern New Jersey (Bergen, Passaic, Hudson, Union, Essex, Morris, Hudson, Hunterdon, Middlesex, Mercer and Somerset county/counties), Manhattan, New York City, Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, Bronx, Westchester and Rockland.

Tags: rolling door terminology, rolling gate terminology, Dasma Technical Sheet #277, rolling steel door vocabulary

Rolling Steel Fire Doors: Drop Testing and Annual Follow-Up

Posted by Gray Decker Ariam on Fri, Mar 17, 2017 @ 07:51 AM

 

Rolling Steel Fire Doors Drop Testing and Annual Follow-Up door service.

 

DASMA Technical Data Sheet 271 v2.jpg

 

General

This Technical Data Sheet provides facility managers with guidelines for evaluation of rolling fire doors designed and tested to provide the automatic closing fire protection indicated on the fire door label. The automatic closing of the door must be tested at the time the door is installed, and the door shall be inspected and tested not less than annually as required by NFPA 80. This requirement applies to all fire doors – even those that are not used and remain in the closed position. The doors must be checked regularly for conditions that may affect the operation of the door. DASMA recommends that the following procedures be observed:

Inspection:

  • Inspect fire doors for damage to guides, curtain and endlocks, bottom bar, hood and operating mechanism.
  • Refer to DASMA Technical Data Sheet #270 (“Recommended Rolling Door Maintenance Practice”)
  • Refer to NFPA 80 (Standard for Fire Doors and Other Opening Protectives)
  • Ensure that the door’s operating mechanisms, fuse links and release chain/cable are not painted, coated with dust or grease, and/or covered with debris.
  • Open and close the door to inspect for any indications of damaged parts.
  • Remove flammable substances on each side of the firewall opening near the fire door.

 

Droptest:

  • Have a trained door systems technician perform an inspection and drop test of all fire door automatic closing features.
  • Establish a contract with the door service provider regarding the cost of the inspection and drop test. Fire door deficiencies identified during the pre-drop test inspection should be corrected before the drop test. The drop test contract should acknowledge the fact that components may fail during the drop test that are not the fault of the service provider and are not included in the cost of the drop test.
  • Document the drop test with the attached DASMA Drop Test Form.
  • When subjected to drop testing, the door must close completely and rest on the sill. NFPA 80 states that the average closing speed must not exceed 24 inches per second and must be at least 6 inches per second.
  • The door must be drop tested twice – once to verify proper operation and full closure, and a second time to verify that the automatic closing device was properly reset.

 

DASMA ROLLING STEEL FIRE DOOR DROP TEST FORM

General

NFPA 80 and Model Codes require the inspection and testing of fire doors to demonstrate proper operation, full closure, and proper reset. Perform the visual inspection before the operational check, or before the drop tests of the fire door, in order to reduce the risk of failure during the drop tests. Use the form below to record the Visual, Operational, and Drop Test results. Check Pass or Fail in the boxes. See the Guidelines for additional information.

The drop tests, reset, repairs and/or maintenance should be performed by a trained door system technician with complete knowledge of this type of fire door and the manufacturer's instructions. Repair parts must be obtained from the original door manufacturer. After repairs are completed, the door must be tested to assure proper door operation and automatic closing capability. The fire door must be in the fully open position before the drop test. Reset the door following the drop test and test again.

Rolling steel fire doors drop testing and annual follow up; Drop Test form to record the Visual, Operational, and Drop Test results

Design Consultation

GUIDELINES

VISUAL INSPECTION:

Conduct a visual inspection for anything that may cause a hazard during testing or affect proper operation or resetting.

Verify that:

  1. Mounting and assembly bolts are not missing or loose.
  2. Welds and weld locations comply with installation method for fire door assemblies welded to steel jambs per manufacturer’s installation instructions.
  3. Fusible links are located per manufacturer's instructions.
  4. Guide assemblies have the required fire expansion clearance per manufacturer's instructions.
  5. Fusible links and sash chain/cable links are not painted or coated with dust or grease, cable is not kinked or pinched, chain is flexible and not twisted, and raceways are not obstructed.
  6. Smoke detectors/release devices function properly.
  7. Nothing that is not a part of the fire door assembly is attached to any part of the fire door assembly (suspended ceiling, light fixtures, ducting, conduits, framing and any other building materials).

Schedule Service

Check for damaged or missing components:

  1. Slats – bent; tears or holes; metal fatigue.
  2. Endlocks – missing; broken; bent; loose
  3. Bottom Bar – bent angles; loose bolts.
  4. Guide Assembly – bent angles or channels; loose bolts; curtain entry misalignment.
  5. Hood (and Flame Baffle when required) or Fascia – bent; rubbing curtain; holes; loose fasteners; metal fatigue; missing intermediate supports (when required).
  6. Automatic Closing Mechanism – missing, broken parts; drop or release arms tied, blocked or wedged.
  7. Operating Mechanism – worn, misaligned or poorly meshed gears; worn roller chains; misaligned or loose sprockets; loose bearings; broken parts; bent shafts.

OPERATIONAL CHECK

Open and close the door using normal operation. If you find the door is not properly balanced, or there is damage or missing parts that may create a hazard or prevent proper operation, have these conditions corrected before conducting a drop test.

DROPTEST

A drop test is required to confirm that the fire door will close automatically during a fire emergency. Use manufacturer's drop test instructions. Door must be fully open before drop test. The door must close fully so the bottom bar rests on the sill. The average closing speed must be between 6" and 24" per second. Test each automatic closing option for the fire door.

RESET THE DOOR

Reset the door per manufacturer's instructions. Open and close the door by normal operation. Drop test the door a second time, and reset again.

Ultimate acceptance of a fire door is the decision of the authority having jurisdiction, as defined in NFPA 80.

Credit: DASMA Technical Data Sheet #271

Call the reliable technicians of Overhead Door Company of The Meadowlands & NYC today for  your rolling steel fire door service, repair or maintenance.

For more information, please give us a call at 973-471-4060 or email us at: info@dockndoor.com We service Northern New Jersey (Bergen, Passaic, Hudson, Union, Essex, Morris, Hudson, Hunterdon, Middlesex, Mercer and Somerset county/counties), Manhattan, New York City, Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, Bronx, Westchester and Rockland.

Tags: fire-rated door, Fire Door Drop Testing, Rolling Steel Fire Doors, DASMA Drop Test Form, Fire-Rated Gate, Rollup Fire Gate

Emergency Service for Parking Garage Doors

Posted by Ranee Patel on Wed, Feb 22, 2017 @ 09:16 AM

As the leaders in overhead door installations for high-end mutli-family residential buildings in New York City, North Jersey, Southern Long Island, Westchester & Rockland Counties, we are also the leaders for emergency service. Every now and then we receive phone calls past 8PM where the overhead door is either stuck open or closed. Once in a while we receive phone calls when the doors look like this: 

This was an unsafe situation where the door was off the tracks and hanging unsecurely. Soon after the customer called, we dispatched a technician right away. He put the door back in the tracks and tested the operation of the door and motor. Within a few hours the door was back to working in its normal operation.Emergeny Service Overhead Door.jpg

If you ever find yourself this situtation with your parking garage door or loading dock door, please call us at: 973-471-4060. 

 

Tags: parking garage door, repair, Emergency Service

Rolling Steel Doors: Fenestrations vs Perforations

Posted by Elizabeth Aceves on Fri, Feb 10, 2017 @ 06:11 PM

You see fenestrated or perforated rolling steel doors in applications like retail store fronts, pharmacies, healthcare, schools, government buildings, etc.  The fenestrations and perforations provide air flow. 

Why is Air Flow important?

• Air flow depends on the pressure differential from one side to the other side of the door. This varies from facility to facility.

– Example: many facilities want to regulate air temperature; by allowing the air to flow they avoid hot spots

– NOTE: rolling steel doors do not carry an air flow rating, rather the doors provide the open area.

What other factors should be considered when specifying a rolling door with perforation or fenestration?

• Security

– The rolling door/grille provides security against theft or unwanted access

• Light infiltration

– Allows natural or ambient light through the door and can reduce lighting expenses

• Visibility

– Allows visual access through door; while still maintaining security. Allows retailers displays to be seen even when they are closed.

Source: PIB#10459

FENESTRATIONS

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ROLLING STEEL PARKING GARAGE-1.jpg

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PERFORATIONS

 

PERFORATIONS FOR ROLLING STEEL DOORS.jpg

ROLLING STEEL PERFORATED DOOR.jpg

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Tags: rolling steel doors, fenestrations, air flow, open air doors, perforations

RollUp Gates/Doors for Loading Dock Ramps

Posted by Elizabeth Aceves on Fri, Dec 23, 2016 @ 07:28 AM

Call us for replacements, repairs and installations of rolling steel overhead ramp doors for your commercial distribution facility.

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Our SuperTechs are available 24 hours a day for emergency service to secure your building.   We service and repair all manfacturers includling Wayne-Dalton, Cornell, Wilson, Atlas, Cookson, Acme and Overhead Door.  Additionally, City Gates, United Steel Products, McKeon Door and Lawrence Doors.

For Service or Quotes in New Jersey or New York City metro region, contact us.

Request an Estimate

 

For more information, please give us a call at 973-471-4060 or email us at: info@dockndoor.com We service Northern New Jersey (Bergen, Passaic, Hudson, Union, Essex, Morris, Hudson, Hunterdon, Middlesex, Mercer and Somerset county/counties), Manhattan, New York City, Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, Bronx, Westchester and Rockland.

 

The Entry Level Rollup Gate Overhead Door System: 610 Series

Posted by Elizabeth Aceves on Sun, Oct 23, 2016 @ 07:20 PM

It is a simple fact that all rolling overhead doors are not made alike. In fact, when it comes to providing the security and functionality you demand, it is important to select a rolling steel door that provides the test of time and heavy use.

At Overhead Door Company of The Meadowlands & NYC we have helped thousands of area clients find the right solution to their rolling door needs. When it comes to the lowest lifetime cost of ownership of an overhead door, you don’t want to compromise on your upfront choice. That is just one reason our rolling steel door Model 610 is such a popular choice with many customers.

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The rolling steel door Model 610 does not just meet the expectations for a standard rolling door, it exceeds the specifications for many projects and applications while remaining an affordable choice. Basic features and options for this steel door include:

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Many additional options add to the Model 610 rolling steel door’s functionality and versatility. For example, the door can be customized with:

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Don’t settle for less than the best when you can choose the affordable Model 610 for your rolling steel door application. Our turnkey services will first walk you through the selection and customization of your rolling steel door. Then, our factory-trained personnel will install your door to exacting standards and continue to provide lifetime support and maintenance customized to your specific requirements.

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Kitchen Counter Doors or Kitchen Rolling Door

Posted by Ranee Patel on Fri, Sep 23, 2016 @ 09:51 AM

Last week I received a frantic call from someone who needed their kitchen rolling counter door repaired in Manhattan. He called a few other door vendors, but was unsatisfied with their service and response time. This door is located inside a Class A Building at a Fortune 500 company in Manhattan. Upon hearing that, I informed the customer we repair all the loading dock and high-speed doors at this location. When he found out that little but important piece of information he was extremely ecstatic. 

Their counter door was coming down too quickly. Usually that means there is not enough tension on the spring. They also wanted to remove the lock at the bottom of the door. Right away we sent a technician. Upon his inspection, there was not enough tension on the spring, but in order to remove the lock we had to replace the entire bottom part of the door, which is called the bottom bar. 

This door is located in one of the many cafeterias at this building in Manhattan, so it was very important to be finished before 7 AM. As soon as we received the new bottom bar, my tech arrived at 5AM prepared to replace it. Luckily everything went well; The customer was so happy he finally found a vendor to service their kitchen counter doors. 

Here are a few pictures of the door. 

Kitchen rolling counter doors are often seen inside cafeterias for hospitals, schools, universities, and Fortune 500 companies. Sometimes the rolling counter doors are motorized, or manual and sometimes they can be fire-rated as well. Please visit our website for information, or call us anytime. 

Non-Insulated Sectional Steel Doors: 416, 420, 424, 430 Series

Posted by Wilford Ordoñez on Tue, Sep 13, 2016 @ 10:00 AM

Rolling sectional doors are often the ideal solution for securing and providing access to large openings in industrial and commercialapplications. While these sectional doors are available in a large variety of styles, sizes and specifications, you want to work with a vendor that provides you with the greatest dependability and lowest overall cost of ownership.

The highly experienced professionals at Overhead Door Company of The Meadowlands & NYC will assist you in finding the most efficient and affordable solution to your specific sectional door needs.

Many of our clients find they do not need the added cost of insulated doors, and we offer a popular series of non-insulated sectional steel doors that are strong, durable and versatile. All of these doors are appropriate for medium to heavy-duty use in commercial, industrial, andgovernment agency applications. A few of the units available in this series include:

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  • Sectional Steel Doors 420. This 20-gauge steel door is perfect for openings up to 31´2" (9500 mm) in width and 24´1" (7341 mm) in height. Just two of many custom options include weatherstripping and reinforced struts.

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  • Sectional Steel Doors 424. This unit offer a 2" (51 mm) panel thickness, 16-gauge steel intermediate and end stiles, ribbed steel exterior and a white paint finish. Numerous options are also available.

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  • Sectional Steel Doors 430. The Model 430 accommodates sizes up to 20´2" (6147 mm) in width and 16´1" (4902 mm) in height and is ideal for many medium-duty applications. This unit offers a nominal 24-gauge, ribbed, white galvanized steel exterior with 16-gauge steel intermediate and end stiles. It is also available in industrial brown.

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One call to Overhead Door Company of The Meadowlands & NYC will provide you with the peace of mind you expect and deserve when selecting the right sectional steel doors for your specific requirements.

For more information, please give us a call at 973-471-4060 or email us at: info@dockndoor.com We service Northern New Jersey (Bergen, Passaic, Hudson, Union, Essex, Morris, Hudson, Hunterdon, Middlesex, Mercer and Somerset county/counties), Manhattan, New York City, Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, Bronx, Westchester and Rockland.

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